Thousands of strangers attend funeral for El Paso shooting victim

Exactly two weeks ago, Antonio Basco lost his wife, and only family member, in the El Paso massacre.

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On Saturday morning, he said his final goodbye to his beloved Margie Reckard — but with hundreds of fellow community members standing behind him.

More than 3,000 people paid their respects Friday night at a visitation for Reckard in El Paso, according to the Perches Funeral Homes. Hundreds were expected to attend her funeral Saturday morning.

“It was the most beautiful thing I’ve ever seen,” Basco said outside the cemetery early Saturday, speaking about all who have supported him.

“I love El Paso and [I’m] glad to be your family. Thank you very much,” he said. “I got the world’s largest family.”

Basco welcomed strangers to attend the services because he didn’t have any family nearby.

The response to his invitation was so overwhelming that the funeral staff relocated the service to a bigger venue.

PHOTO: Antonio Basco is comforted during the wake of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.
Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Antonio Basco is comforted during the wake of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.

PHOTO: Antonio Basco is comforted during the wake of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.
Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Antonio Basco is comforted during the wake of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.

“We didn’t know Margie, but we felt that we should be here to pay our respects to Mr. Basco. I don’t know how it feels to not have anybody,” Dolores Luna, a resident of El Paso, said at Reckard’s visitation Friday night. “We are his family here in El Paso. That’s why we’re all her to support him.”

Reckard was an employee of the Walmart, where she and 21 others were killed and more than two dozen were injured when a gunman opened fire on Aug. 3.

Basco arrived at the prayer service Friday to a standing ovation from the hundreds in attendance who had lined up outside for hours and hugs from dozens of attendees.

“Thank you for allowing us to go through this process, for inviting us in. We thank you, Tony, for inviting us. We would have never known that you needed us to be friends, but look at all these friends you have,” Harrison Johnson, director of the Perches Funeral Homes, said during the service.

Jordan Ballard, who is from Los Angeles, flew to El Paso specifically to attend the memorial and funeral, despite being a total stranger.

“His story moved me,” Ballard told El Paso ABC affiliate KVIA.

PHOTO: Two men carry the coffin containing the body of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, during her wake in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.
Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Two men carry the coffin containing the body of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, during her wake in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.

Daniel Ramos, an assistant special agent at the FBI El Paso Division, said he felt it was his duty to be there for Basco.

“I had to come. Most of my co-workers felt the same way: to show that we’re all a family,” Ramos said while waiting in line.

The service was originally scheduled to be held in a chapel that seats 250 people, but Perches had “more than 250 calls” from well-wishers all over the country so they were moved to La Paz Faith Memorial and Spiritual Center, a facility owned by Perches.

“The outpouring and amazing response from all over, not just our city, but the country is gonna be more than the capacity of the venue that we have,” Johnson told ABC News early Friday.

“I’m sure it’s gonna be thousands,” he added.

La Paz seats 500 people.

PHOTO: Mourners form a line outside the La Paz Faith memorial center during the public visitation service of Walmart shooting victim Margie Reckard, to which her husband Antonio Basco had invited the community in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 16, 2019.
Ivan Pierre Aguirre/Reuters

Mourners form a line outside the La Paz Faith memorial center during the public visitation service of Walmart shooting victim Margie Reckard, to which her husband Antonio Basco had invited the community in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 16, 2019.

“I’ve been doing this for over 30 years and I’ve never seen this … for, I guess so to speak, a non-high profile person,” Johnson said. “I’ve never experienced such an outpouring of love and support and caring for what you would say is pretty much just an ordinary citizen, you know a loving person.”

Since Perches posted on Facebook that Basco “welcomes anyone to attend his wife’s service” because he had no nearby family, people from as far away as California have expressed interest in attending Reckard’s funeral, Johnson said.

He said Basco has been “overwhelmed” by the response. After speaking with Basco Friday morning, Johnson said he seemed to be “doing well.”

Basco could not immediately be reached.

Reckard’s two sons and her daughter arrived in El Paso Thursday to attend their mother’s funeral, Johnson added.

PHOTO: Antonio Basco, whose wife Margie Reckard was murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, stands next to her coffin at a visitation service to which he had invited the public in El Paso, Texas, on Friday, Aug. 16, 2019.
Ivan Pierre Aguirre/Reuters

Antonio Basco, whose wife Margie Reckard was murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, stands next to her coffin at a visitation service to which he had invited the public in El Paso, Texas, on Friday, Aug. 16, 2019.

The FBI El Paso Division and its Victim Service Specialists will be in attendance at Reckard’s service Friday.

“As part of this community, we won’t let anyone so severely hurt by this tragedy go through this alone,” the department tweeted Thursday. “Mr. Basco, we stand with you.”

ABC News’ Kaylee Hartung contributed to this report.

Thousands of strangers attend funeral for El Paso shooting victim

Exactly two weeks ago, Antonio Basco lost his wife, and only family member, in the El Paso massacre.

Interested in El Paso Shooting?

Add El Paso Shooting as an interest to stay up to date on the latest El Paso Shooting news, video, and analysis from ABC News.

On Saturday morning, he said his final goodbye to his beloved Margie Reckard — but with hundreds of fellow community members standing behind him.

More than 3,000 people paid their respects Friday night at a visitation for Reckard in El Paso, according to the Perches Funeral Homes. Hundreds were expected to attend her funeral Saturday morning.

“It was the most beautiful thing I’ve ever seen,” Basco said outside the cemetery early Saturday, speaking about all who have supported him.

“I love El Paso and [I’m] glad to be your family. Thank you very much,” he said. “I got the world’s largest family.”

Basco welcomed strangers to attend the services because he didn’t have any family nearby.

The response to his invitation was so overwhelming that the funeral staff relocated the service to a bigger venue.

PHOTO: Antonio Basco is comforted during the wake of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.
Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Antonio Basco is comforted during the wake of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.

PHOTO: Antonio Basco is comforted during the wake of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.
Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Antonio Basco is comforted during the wake of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.

“We didn’t know Margie, but we felt that we should be here to pay our respects to Mr. Basco. I don’t know how it feels to not have anybody,” Dolores Luna, a resident of El Paso, said at Reckard’s visitation Friday night. “We are his family here in El Paso. That’s why we’re all her to support him.”

Reckard was an employee of the Walmart, where she and 21 others were killed and more than two dozen were injured when a gunman opened fire on Aug. 3.

Basco arrived at the prayer service Friday to a standing ovation from the hundreds in attendance who had lined up outside for hours and hugs from dozens of attendees.

“Thank you for allowing us to go through this process, for inviting us in. We thank you, Tony, for inviting us. We would have never known that you needed us to be friends, but look at all these friends you have,” Harrison Johnson, director of the Perches Funeral Homes, said during the service.

Jordan Ballard, who is from Los Angeles, flew to El Paso specifically to attend the memorial and funeral, despite being a total stranger.

“His story moved me,” Ballard told El Paso ABC affiliate KVIA.

PHOTO: Two men carry the coffin containing the body of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, during her wake in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.
Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Two men carry the coffin containing the body of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, during her wake in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.

Daniel Ramos, an assistant special agent at the FBI El Paso Division, said he felt it was his duty to be there for Basco.

“I had to come. Most of my co-workers felt the same way: to show that we’re all a family,” Ramos said while waiting in line.

The service was originally scheduled to be held in a chapel that seats 250 people, but Perches had “more than 250 calls” from well-wishers all over the country so they were moved to La Paz Faith Memorial and Spiritual Center, a facility owned by Perches.

“The outpouring and amazing response from all over, not just our city, but the country is gonna be more than the capacity of the venue that we have,” Johnson told ABC News early Friday.

“I’m sure it’s gonna be thousands,” he added.

La Paz seats 500 people.

PHOTO: Mourners form a line outside the La Paz Faith memorial center during the public visitation service of Walmart shooting victim Margie Reckard, to which her husband Antonio Basco had invited the community in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 16, 2019.
Ivan Pierre Aguirre/Reuters

Mourners form a line outside the La Paz Faith memorial center during the public visitation service of Walmart shooting victim Margie Reckard, to which her husband Antonio Basco had invited the community in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 16, 2019.

“I’ve been doing this for over 30 years and I’ve never seen this … for, I guess so to speak, a non-high profile person,” Johnson said. “I’ve never experienced such an outpouring of love and support and caring for what you would say is pretty much just an ordinary citizen, you know a loving person.”

Since Perches posted on Facebook that Basco “welcomes anyone to attend his wife’s service” because he had no nearby family, people from as far away as California have expressed interest in attending Reckard’s funeral, Johnson said.

He said Basco has been “overwhelmed” by the response. After speaking with Basco Friday morning, Johnson said he seemed to be “doing well.”

Basco could not immediately be reached.

Reckard’s two sons and her daughter arrived in El Paso Thursday to attend their mother’s funeral, Johnson added.

PHOTO: Antonio Basco, whose wife Margie Reckard was murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, stands next to her coffin at a visitation service to which he had invited the public in El Paso, Texas, on Friday, Aug. 16, 2019.
Ivan Pierre Aguirre/Reuters

Antonio Basco, whose wife Margie Reckard was murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, stands next to her coffin at a visitation service to which he had invited the public in El Paso, Texas, on Friday, Aug. 16, 2019.

The FBI El Paso Division and its Victim Service Specialists will be in attendance at Reckard’s service Friday.

“As part of this community, we won’t let anyone so severely hurt by this tragedy go through this alone,” the department tweeted Thursday. “Mr. Basco, we stand with you.”

ABC News’ Kaylee Hartung contributed to this report.

Thousands of strangers attend funeral for El Paso shooting victim

Exactly two weeks ago, Antonio Basco lost his wife, and only family member, in the El Paso massacre.

Interested in El Paso Shooting?

Add El Paso Shooting as an interest to stay up to date on the latest El Paso Shooting news, video, and analysis from ABC News.

On Saturday morning, he said his final goodbye to his beloved Margie Reckard — but with hundreds of fellow community members standing behind him.

More than 3,000 people paid their respects Friday night at a visitation for Reckard in El Paso, according to the Perches Funeral Homes. Hundreds were expected to attend her funeral Saturday morning.

“It was the most beautiful thing I’ve ever seen,” Basco said outside the cemetery early Saturday, speaking about all who have supported him.

“I love El Paso and [I’m] glad to be your family. Thank you very much,” he said. “I got the world’s largest family.”

Basco welcomed strangers to attend the services because he didn’t have any family nearby.

The response to his invitation was so overwhelming that the funeral staff relocated the service to a bigger venue.

PHOTO: Antonio Basco is comforted during the wake of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.
Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Antonio Basco is comforted during the wake of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.

PHOTO: Antonio Basco is comforted during the wake of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.
Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Antonio Basco is comforted during the wake of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.

“We didn’t know Margie, but we felt that we should be here to pay our respects to Mr. Basco. I don’t know how it feels to not have anybody,” Dolores Luna, a resident of El Paso, said at Reckard’s visitation Friday night. “We are his family here in El Paso. That’s why we’re all her to support him.”

Reckard was an employee of the Walmart, where she and 21 others were killed and more than two dozen were injured when a gunman opened fire on Aug. 3.

Basco arrived at the prayer service Friday to a standing ovation from the hundreds in attendance who had lined up outside for hours and hugs from dozens of attendees.

“Thank you for allowing us to go through this process, for inviting us in. We thank you, Tony, for inviting us. We would have never known that you needed us to be friends, but look at all these friends you have,” Harrison Johnson, director of the Perches Funeral Homes, said during the service.

Jordan Ballard, who is from Los Angeles, flew to El Paso specifically to attend the memorial and funeral, despite being a total stranger.

“His story moved me,” Ballard told El Paso ABC affiliate KVIA.

PHOTO: Two men carry the coffin containing the body of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, during her wake in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.
Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Two men carry the coffin containing the body of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, during her wake in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.

Daniel Ramos, an assistant special agent at the FBI El Paso Division, said he felt it was his duty to be there for Basco.

“I had to come. Most of my co-workers felt the same way: to show that we’re all a family,” Ramos said while waiting in line.

The service was originally scheduled to be held in a chapel that seats 250 people, but Perches had “more than 250 calls” from well-wishers all over the country so they were moved to La Paz Faith Memorial and Spiritual Center, a facility owned by Perches.

“The outpouring and amazing response from all over, not just our city, but the country is gonna be more than the capacity of the venue that we have,” Johnson told ABC News early Friday.

“I’m sure it’s gonna be thousands,” he added.

La Paz seats 500 people.

PHOTO: Mourners form a line outside the La Paz Faith memorial center during the public visitation service of Walmart shooting victim Margie Reckard, to which her husband Antonio Basco had invited the community in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 16, 2019.
Ivan Pierre Aguirre/Reuters

Mourners form a line outside the La Paz Faith memorial center during the public visitation service of Walmart shooting victim Margie Reckard, to which her husband Antonio Basco had invited the community in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 16, 2019.

“I’ve been doing this for over 30 years and I’ve never seen this … for, I guess so to speak, a non-high profile person,” Johnson said. “I’ve never experienced such an outpouring of love and support and caring for what you would say is pretty much just an ordinary citizen, you know a loving person.”

Since Perches posted on Facebook that Basco “welcomes anyone to attend his wife’s service” because he had no nearby family, people from as far away as California have expressed interest in attending Reckard’s funeral, Johnson said.

He said Basco has been “overwhelmed” by the response. After speaking with Basco Friday morning, Johnson said he seemed to be “doing well.”

Basco could not immediately be reached.

Reckard’s two sons and her daughter arrived in El Paso Thursday to attend their mother’s funeral, Johnson added.

PHOTO: Antonio Basco, whose wife Margie Reckard was murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, stands next to her coffin at a visitation service to which he had invited the public in El Paso, Texas, on Friday, Aug. 16, 2019.
Ivan Pierre Aguirre/Reuters

Antonio Basco, whose wife Margie Reckard was murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, stands next to her coffin at a visitation service to which he had invited the public in El Paso, Texas, on Friday, Aug. 16, 2019.

The FBI El Paso Division and its Victim Service Specialists will be in attendance at Reckard’s service Friday.

“As part of this community, we won’t let anyone so severely hurt by this tragedy go through this alone,” the department tweeted Thursday. “Mr. Basco, we stand with you.”

ABC News’ Kaylee Hartung contributed to this report.

Thousands of strangers attend funeral for El Paso shooting victim

Exactly two weeks ago, Antonio Basco lost his wife, and only family member, in the El Paso massacre.

Interested in El Paso Shooting?

Add El Paso Shooting as an interest to stay up to date on the latest El Paso Shooting news, video, and analysis from ABC News.

On Saturday morning, he said his final goodbye to his beloved Margie Reckard — but with hundreds of fellow community members standing behind him.

More than 3,000 people paid their respects Friday night at a visitation for Reckard in El Paso, according to the Perches Funeral Homes. Hundreds were expected to attend her funeral Saturday morning.

“It was the most beautiful thing I’ve ever seen,” Basco said outside the cemetery early Saturday, speaking about all who have supported him.

“I love El Paso and [I’m] glad to be your family. Thank you very much,” he said. “I got the world’s largest family.”

Basco welcomed strangers to attend the services because he didn’t have any family nearby.

The response to his invitation was so overwhelming that the funeral staff relocated the service to a bigger venue.

PHOTO: Antonio Basco is comforted during the wake of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.
Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Antonio Basco is comforted during the wake of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.

PHOTO: Antonio Basco is comforted during the wake of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.
Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Antonio Basco is comforted during the wake of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.

“We didn’t know Margie, but we felt that we should be here to pay our respects to Mr. Basco. I don’t know how it feels to not have anybody,” Dolores Luna, a resident of El Paso, said at Reckard’s visitation Friday night. “We are his family here in El Paso. That’s why we’re all her to support him.”

Reckard was an employee of the Walmart, where she and 21 others were killed and more than two dozen were injured when a gunman opened fire on Aug. 3.

Basco arrived at the prayer service Friday to a standing ovation from the hundreds in attendance who had lined up outside for hours and hugs from dozens of attendees.

“Thank you for allowing us to go through this process, for inviting us in. We thank you, Tony, for inviting us. We would have never known that you needed us to be friends, but look at all these friends you have,” Harrison Johnson, director of the Perches Funeral Homes, said during the service.

Jordan Ballard, who is from Los Angeles, flew to El Paso specifically to attend the memorial and funeral, despite being a total stranger.

“His story moved me,” Ballard told El Paso ABC affiliate KVIA.

PHOTO: Two men carry the coffin containing the body of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, during her wake in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.
Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Two men carry the coffin containing the body of his wife Margie Reckard, murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, during her wake in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 17, 2019.

Daniel Ramos, an assistant special agent at the FBI El Paso Division, said he felt it was his duty to be there for Basco.

“I had to come. Most of my co-workers felt the same way: to show that we’re all a family,” Ramos said while waiting in line.

The service was originally scheduled to be held in a chapel that seats 250 people, but Perches had “more than 250 calls” from well-wishers all over the country so they were moved to La Paz Faith Memorial and Spiritual Center, a facility owned by Perches.

“The outpouring and amazing response from all over, not just our city, but the country is gonna be more than the capacity of the venue that we have,” Johnson told ABC News early Friday.

“I’m sure it’s gonna be thousands,” he added.

La Paz seats 500 people.

PHOTO: Mourners form a line outside the La Paz Faith memorial center during the public visitation service of Walmart shooting victim Margie Reckard, to which her husband Antonio Basco had invited the community in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 16, 2019.
Ivan Pierre Aguirre/Reuters

Mourners form a line outside the La Paz Faith memorial center during the public visitation service of Walmart shooting victim Margie Reckard, to which her husband Antonio Basco had invited the community in El Paso, Texas, U.S. August 16, 2019.

“I’ve been doing this for over 30 years and I’ve never seen this … for, I guess so to speak, a non-high profile person,” Johnson said. “I’ve never experienced such an outpouring of love and support and caring for what you would say is pretty much just an ordinary citizen, you know a loving person.”

Since Perches posted on Facebook that Basco “welcomes anyone to attend his wife’s service” because he had no nearby family, people from as far away as California have expressed interest in attending Reckard’s funeral, Johnson said.

He said Basco has been “overwhelmed” by the response. After speaking with Basco Friday morning, Johnson said he seemed to be “doing well.”

Basco could not immediately be reached.

Reckard’s two sons and her daughter arrived in El Paso Thursday to attend their mother’s funeral, Johnson added.

PHOTO: Antonio Basco, whose wife Margie Reckard was murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, stands next to her coffin at a visitation service to which he had invited the public in El Paso, Texas, on Friday, Aug. 16, 2019.
Ivan Pierre Aguirre/Reuters

Antonio Basco, whose wife Margie Reckard was murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store, stands next to her coffin at a visitation service to which he had invited the public in El Paso, Texas, on Friday, Aug. 16, 2019.

The FBI El Paso Division and its Victim Service Specialists will be in attendance at Reckard’s service Friday.

“As part of this community, we won’t let anyone so severely hurt by this tragedy go through this alone,” the department tweeted Thursday. “Mr. Basco, we stand with you.”

ABC News’ Kaylee Hartung contributed to this report.

13 arrested, 6 injured at Portland right wing rally: Police

Thirteen people were arrested and six were injured, as over 1,200 right-wing demonstrators and counterprotesters descended on downtown Portland on Saturday, police said.

Portland Police Lt. Tina Jones said there had been at least 13 arrests, while at least one person had been take to the hospital with injuries. In addition, officers confiscated a number of weapons, including knives, shields and stun guns.

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler said that he was pleased that police were able to keep the city safe while also helping to “protect the core American value of free speech.”

Police said none of the injuries were caused by officers. There was one incident where police deployed pepper balls, authorities said.

PHOTO: Portland police officer Bonczijk stretches before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.
Noah Berger/AP Photo

Portland police officer Bonczijk stretches before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.

Ahead of Saturday’s rallies, Wheeler issued a video message stating, “if you’re planning on coming here on Aug. 17 with the intent to commit violence, we don’t want you here.”

Jessyca Jones, a counterprotester who was on the streets on Saturday, told ABC News the environment was “tense” and that there had been “lots of fights.”

At around 4:30 p.m. local time, and the Portland Police tweeted, “Police are having plastic water bottles thrown at them as they are making an arrest on SW Yamhill and Park.” After that, police began advising people to clear the streets or face arrest.

“Police are advising this is now a civil disturbance. Crowd needs to leave the area and go Northbound on Park or any direction eastbound. This means everyone,” Portland Police tweeted.

The city has been bracing for several militant right-wing groups to arrive in the city, along with scores of counter-protesters.

Enrique Tarrio, national head of the Proud Boys, who describe themselves as an all-male “western chauvinist” group, and former InfoWars personality Joe Biggs, organized the “End Domestic Terrorism” rally on Saturday that started at 11 a.m. local time. Initially, the crowds moved in slowly, and were met by a heavy police presence, in which local police were bolstered by more than a dozen other law enforcement agencies.

Members of other far-right extremist groups, including the American Guard, the Three Percenters and the Daily Stormers, were also expected to attend in the hopes of declaring militant leftists, or anti-fascists known as “anitfa,” a domestic terrorist group.

PHOTO: Alt-right groups hold the End Domestic Terrorism rally at Tom McCall Waterfront Park on August 17, 2019 in Portland, Oregon.
Karen Ducey/Getty Images

Alt-right groups hold the End Domestic Terrorism rally at Tom McCall Waterfront Park on August 17, 2019 in Portland, Oregon.

One right-wing militia group, Oath Keepers, disavowed the rally for fear of being associated with white supremacists.

“We do not believe the organizers are taking the steps necessary to ensure that white nationalist and suspected white nationalist groups and individuals will be excluded,” said Stewart Rhodes, the group’s founder, in a statement on its website.

Previous rallies featuring right-wing groups and antifa have turned violent in Portland, a city so closely associated with liberal hipsters it inspired the parody show “Portlandia.”

Local authorities have beefed up security and have been joined by an array of other law enforcement agencies “on a scale that this city hasn’t seen in years,” Wheeler said.

Early Saturday, Trump criticized antifa in a tweet, and said Portland is “being watched very closely.”

“Major consideration is being given to naming ANTIFA an ‘ORGANIZATION OF TERROR,'” the tweet read. “Hopefully the Mayor will be able to properly do his job!”

The president did not, however, criticize the right-wing organizers.

It was unclear whether Joey Gibson, the leader of right-wing Patriot Prayer, attended the rally. He and five other men have been arrested this month, on charges stemming from a violent outburst on May 1 at Cider Riot, a bar that is a haven for the city’s leftists. Videos of the May Day incident show men associated with the group unleashing pepper spray, fighting and striking people with batons.

PHOTO: A member of the Proud Boys, who declined to give his name, carries a flag before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.
Noah Berger/AP Photo

A member of the Proud Boys, who declined to give his name, carries a flag before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.

He turned himself in to authorities and was bailed out on Friday.

ABC News’ Christen Hill contributed reporting.

13 arrested, 6 injured at Portland right wing rally: Police

Thirteen people were arrested and six were injured, as over 1,200 right-wing demonstrators and counterprotesters descended on downtown Portland on Saturday, police said.

Portland Police Lt. Tina Jones said there had been at least 13 arrests, while at least one person had been take to the hospital with injuries. In addition, officers confiscated a number of weapons, including knives, shields and stun guns.

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler said that he was pleased that police were able to keep the city safe while also helping to “protect the core American value of free speech.”

Police said none of the injuries were caused by officers. There was one incident where police deployed pepper balls, authorities said.

PHOTO: Portland police officer Bonczijk stretches before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.
Noah Berger/AP Photo

Portland police officer Bonczijk stretches before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.

Ahead of Saturday’s rallies, Wheeler issued a video message stating, “if you’re planning on coming here on Aug. 17 with the intent to commit violence, we don’t want you here.”

Jessyca Jones, a counterprotester who was on the streets on Saturday, told ABC News the environment was “tense” and that there had been “lots of fights.”

At around 4:30 p.m. local time, and the Portland Police tweeted, “Police are having plastic water bottles thrown at them as they are making an arrest on SW Yamhill and Park.” After that, police began advising people to clear the streets or face arrest.

“Police are advising this is now a civil disturbance. Crowd needs to leave the area and go Northbound on Park or any direction eastbound. This means everyone,” Portland Police tweeted.

The city has been bracing for several militant right-wing groups to arrive in the city, along with scores of counter-protesters.

Enrique Tarrio, national head of the Proud Boys, who describe themselves as an all-male “western chauvinist” group, and former InfoWars personality Joe Biggs, organized the “End Domestic Terrorism” rally on Saturday that started at 11 a.m. local time. Initially, the crowds moved in slowly, and were met by a heavy police presence, in which local police were bolstered by more than a dozen other law enforcement agencies.

Members of other far-right extremist groups, including the American Guard, the Three Percenters and the Daily Stormers, were also expected to attend in the hopes of declaring militant leftists, or anti-fascists known as “anitfa,” a domestic terrorist group.

PHOTO: Alt-right groups hold the End Domestic Terrorism rally at Tom McCall Waterfront Park on August 17, 2019 in Portland, Oregon.
Karen Ducey/Getty Images

Alt-right groups hold the End Domestic Terrorism rally at Tom McCall Waterfront Park on August 17, 2019 in Portland, Oregon.

One right-wing militia group, Oath Keepers, disavowed the rally for fear of being associated with white supremacists.

“We do not believe the organizers are taking the steps necessary to ensure that white nationalist and suspected white nationalist groups and individuals will be excluded,” said Stewart Rhodes, the group’s founder, in a statement on its website.

Previous rallies featuring right-wing groups and antifa have turned violent in Portland, a city so closely associated with liberal hipsters it inspired the parody show “Portlandia.”

Local authorities have beefed up security and have been joined by an array of other law enforcement agencies “on a scale that this city hasn’t seen in years,” Wheeler said.

Early Saturday, Trump criticized antifa in a tweet, and said Portland is “being watched very closely.”

“Major consideration is being given to naming ANTIFA an ‘ORGANIZATION OF TERROR,'” the tweet read. “Hopefully the Mayor will be able to properly do his job!”

The president did not, however, criticize the right-wing organizers.

It was unclear whether Joey Gibson, the leader of right-wing Patriot Prayer, attended the rally. He and five other men have been arrested this month, on charges stemming from a violent outburst on May 1 at Cider Riot, a bar that is a haven for the city’s leftists. Videos of the May Day incident show men associated with the group unleashing pepper spray, fighting and striking people with batons.

PHOTO: A member of the Proud Boys, who declined to give his name, carries a flag before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.
Noah Berger/AP Photo

A member of the Proud Boys, who declined to give his name, carries a flag before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.

He turned himself in to authorities and was bailed out on Friday.

ABC News’ Christen Hill contributed reporting.

Portland braces for right wing rally, counterprotesters

Portland, a city so closely associated with liberal hipsters it inspired the parody show “Portlandia,” braced for a rally of far-right groups protesting left-wing organizations Saturday, while President Donald Trump weighed in on the controversy.

Enrique Tarrio, national head of the Proud Boys, who describe themselves as an all-male “western chauvinist” group, and former InfoWars personality Joe Biggs, have organized an “End Domestic Terrorism” rally on Saturday at 11 a.m. local time.

Members of other far-right extremist groups, including the American Guard, the Three Percenters and the Daily Stormers, were also expected to attend in the hopes of declaring militant leftists, or anti-fascists, or “anitfa,” a domestic terrorist group.

PHOTO: A member of the Proud Boys, who declined to give his name, carries a flag before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.
Noah Berger/AP Photo

A member of the Proud Boys, who declined to give his name, carries a flag before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.

Counterprotesters were also expected in droves.

PHOTO: Black-clad protesters, gathered to oppose conservative groups staging an End Domestic Terrorism rally, hold signs in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.
Noah Berger/AP Photo

Black-clad protesters, gathered to oppose conservative groups staging an “End Domestic Terrorism” rally, hold signs in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.

One right-wing militia group, Oath Keepers, disavowed the rally for fears of being associated with white supremacists.

“We do not believe the organizers are taking the steps necessary to ensure that white nationalist and suspected white nationalist groups and individuals will be excluded,” said Stewart Rhodes, the group’s founder, in a statement on its website.

Early Saturday, Trump criticized antifa in a tweet, and said Portland is “being watched very closely.”

“Major consideration is being given to naming ANTIFA an ‘ORGANIZATION OF TERROR,'” the tweet read. “Hopefully the Mayor will be able to properly do his job!”

The president did not, however, criticize the right-wing organizers.

PHOTO: Portland police officer Bonczijk stretches before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.
Noah Berger/AP Photo

Portland police officer Bonczijk stretches before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.

Previous rallies featuring right-wing groups and antifa have turned violent in Portland, prompting a warning from Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler.

Ahead of Saturday’s rallies, Wheeler issued a video message stating, “if you’re planning on coming here on August 17th with the intent to commit violence, we don’t want you here.”

It was unclear whether Joey Gibson, the leader of right-wing Patriot Prayer, will attend the rally. He and five other men have been arrested this month, on charges stemming from a violent outburst on May 1 at Cider Riot, a bar that is a haven for the city’s leftists. Videos of the May Day incident show men associated with the group spraying pepper spray, fighting and striking people with batons.

He turned himself in to authorities and bailed out on Friday.

Local authorities have beefed up security and have been joined by an array of other law enforcement agencies “on a scale that this city hasn’t seen in years,” Wheeler said.

Portland braces for right wing rally, counterprotesters

Portland, a city so closely associated with liberal hipsters it inspired the parody show “Portlandia,” braced for a rally of far-right groups protesting left-wing organizations Saturday, while President Donald Trump weighed in on the controversy.

Enrique Tarrio, national head of the Proud Boys, who describe themselves as an all-male “western chauvinist” group, and former InfoWars personality Joe Biggs, have organized an “End Domestic Terrorism” rally on Saturday at 11 a.m. local time.

Members of other far-right extremist groups, including the American Guard, the Three Percenters and the Daily Stormers, were also expected to attend in the hopes of declaring militant leftists, or anti-fascists, or “anitfa,” a domestic terrorist group.

PHOTO: A member of the Proud Boys, who declined to give his name, carries a flag before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.
Noah Berger/AP Photo

A member of the Proud Boys, who declined to give his name, carries a flag before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.

Counterprotesters were also expected in droves.

PHOTO: Black-clad protesters, gathered to oppose conservative groups staging an End Domestic Terrorism rally, hold signs in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.
Noah Berger/AP Photo

Black-clad protesters, gathered to oppose conservative groups staging an “End Domestic Terrorism” rally, hold signs in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.

One right-wing militia group, Oath Keepers, disavowed the rally for fears of being associated with white supremacists.

“We do not believe the organizers are taking the steps necessary to ensure that white nationalist and suspected white nationalist groups and individuals will be excluded,” said Stewart Rhodes, the group’s founder, in a statement on its website.

Early Saturday, Trump criticized antifa in a tweet, and said Portland is “being watched very closely.”

“Major consideration is being given to naming ANTIFA an ‘ORGANIZATION OF TERROR,'” the tweet read. “Hopefully the Mayor will be able to properly do his job!”

The president did not, however, criticize the right-wing organizers.

PHOTO: Portland police officer Bonczijk stretches before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.
Noah Berger/AP Photo

Portland police officer Bonczijk stretches before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.

Previous rallies featuring right-wing groups and antifa have turned violent in Portland, prompting a warning from Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler.

Ahead of Saturday’s rallies, Wheeler issued a video message stating, “if you’re planning on coming here on August 17th with the intent to commit violence, we don’t want you here.”

It was unclear whether Joey Gibson, the leader of right-wing Patriot Prayer, will attend the rally. He and five other men have been arrested this month, on charges stemming from a violent outburst on May 1 at Cider Riot, a bar that is a haven for the city’s leftists. Videos of the May Day incident show men associated with the group spraying pepper spray, fighting and striking people with batons.

He turned himself in to authorities and bailed out on Friday.

Local authorities have beefed up security and have been joined by an array of other law enforcement agencies “on a scale that this city hasn’t seen in years,” Wheeler said.

Portland braces for right wing rally, counterprotesters

Portland, a city so closely associated with liberal hipsters it inspired the parody show “Portlandia,” braced for a rally of far-right groups protesting left-wing organizations Saturday, while President Donald Trump weighed in on the controversy.

Enrique Tarrio, national head of the Proud Boys, who describe themselves as an all-male “western chauvinist” group, and former InfoWars personality Joe Biggs, have organized an “End Domestic Terrorism” rally on Saturday at 11 a.m. local time.

Members of other far-right extremist groups, including the American Guard, the Three Percenters and the Daily Stormers, were also expected to attend in the hopes of declaring militant leftists, or anti-fascists, or “anitfa,” a domestic terrorist group.

PHOTO: A member of the Proud Boys, who declined to give his name, carries a flag before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.
Noah Berger/AP Photo

A member of the Proud Boys, who declined to give his name, carries a flag before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.

Counterprotesters were also expected in droves.

PHOTO: Black-clad protesters, gathered to oppose conservative groups staging an End Domestic Terrorism rally, hold signs in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.
Noah Berger/AP Photo

Black-clad protesters, gathered to oppose conservative groups staging an “End Domestic Terrorism” rally, hold signs in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.

One right-wing militia group, Oath Keepers, disavowed the rally for fears of being associated with white supremacists.

“We do not believe the organizers are taking the steps necessary to ensure that white nationalist and suspected white nationalist groups and individuals will be excluded,” said Stewart Rhodes, the group’s founder, in a statement on its website.

Early Saturday, Trump criticized antifa in a tweet, and said Portland is “being watched very closely.”

“Major consideration is being given to naming ANTIFA an ‘ORGANIZATION OF TERROR,'” the tweet read. “Hopefully the Mayor will be able to properly do his job!”

The president did not, however, criticize the right-wing organizers.

PHOTO: Portland police officer Bonczijk stretches before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.
Noah Berger/AP Photo

Portland police officer Bonczijk stretches before the start of a protest in Portland, Ore., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019.

Previous rallies featuring right-wing groups and antifa have turned violent in Portland, prompting a warning from Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler.

Ahead of Saturday’s rallies, Wheeler issued a video message stating, “if you’re planning on coming here on August 17th with the intent to commit violence, we don’t want you here.”

It was unclear whether Joey Gibson, the leader of right-wing Patriot Prayer, will attend the rally. He and five other men have been arrested this month, on charges stemming from a violent outburst on May 1 at Cider Riot, a bar that is a haven for the city’s leftists. Videos of the May Day incident show men associated with the group spraying pepper spray, fighting and striking people with batons.

He turned himself in to authorities and bailed out on Friday.

Local authorities have beefed up security and have been joined by an array of other law enforcement agencies “on a scale that this city hasn’t seen in years,” Wheeler said.

Person of interest in NYC pressure cooker scare taken into custody: Police source

The person of interest related to the abandoned rice cookers that caused a bomb scare in New York City has been taken into custody, a police source told ABC News Saturday morning.

Interested in New York?

Add New York as an interest to stay up to date on the latest New York news, video, and analysis from ABC News.

Larry Griffin, of West Virginia, was apprehended by police early Saturday.

The police source said Griffin, whom the NYPD identified as the person of interest Friday, was not under arrest.

PHOTO: Police are looking to locate and identify this individual wanted for questioning in regard to the suspicious items inside the Fulton Street subway station in Manhattan, Aug. 16, 2019.
NYPD

Police are looking to locate and identify this individual wanted for questioning in regard to the suspicious items inside the Fulton Street subway station in Manhattan, Aug. 16, 2019.

Cell phone video obtained by ABC News appears to show Griffin in a wheelchair as authorities taken him into custody.

PHOTO: New York police took a person of interest into custody related to the bomb scare at a subway station on Friday, Aug. 16, 2019, one day later in the Bronx.
Provided

New York police took a person of interest into custody related to the bomb scare at a subway station on Friday, Aug. 16, 2019, one day later in the Bronx.

The bomb scare was set off Friday morning when a subway passenger approached two NYPD counterterrorism to alert them about suspicious packages at the Fulton Street subway station in Manhattan. The items turned out to be rice cookers.

PHOTO: A pressure cooker at the Fulton Street subway station in Manhattan, Aug. 16, 2019, was investigated by the bomb squad.
NYPD

A pressure cooker at the Fulton Street subway station in Manhattan, Aug. 16, 2019, was investigated by the bomb squad.

A third suspicious package was reported near a trash can at West 16th Street and 7th Avenue, also in Manhattan, police said.

The NYPD’s bomb squad responded to both locations and deemed the cookers safe. Officials investigated whether the incidents were related.

Later in the day, police identified Griffin as a person of interest and released a picture they say was him.

At a news conference, NYPD Deputy Commissioner John Miller said Griffin wasn’t a suspect, “but certainly someone we want to interview.”

PHOTO: John Miller, Deputy Commissioner of Intelligence and Counterterrorism for the NYPD, speaks to the press near the scene of a suspicious package near the Fulton Street subway station in Lower Manhattan on August 16, 2019, in New York.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

John Miller, Deputy Commissioner of Intelligence and Counterterrorism for the NYPD, speaks to the press near the scene of a suspicious package near the Fulton Street subway station in Lower Manhattan on August 16, 2019, in New York.

Relatives of Griffin told police he contacted them and knows officers want to interview him, the source told ABC News. Griffin told them he didn’t know what to do, the relatives told police, according to the source.

Griffin told family members he found the three rice cookers in front of an Asian restaurant, relatives told police, and only took them because he collects items he finds on the street, the source added.

Police found Griffin in the Bronx in the predawn hours of Saturday. The NYPD Chief of Detectives Dermot Shea tweeted that Griffin has been apprehended and that the investigation continues.

Meanwhile, the Logan County’s Sheriff’s Office in West Virginia, where Griffin has family, posted on Facebook that officers there helped contact the relatives after the FBI Joint Task Force in New York City contacted them. They had hoped to find a location in the New York City area where police could find Griffin, but the relatives didn’t know.

Griffin has told them that he lives on the streets in New York, the source told ABC News.

The Logan County Sheriff’s Office posted that Griffin has been arrested there at least three times in the past eight years for charges ranging from drugs to weapons to “obscene material to seduce a minor.” He was indicted by the Logan County Sheriff’s Department in 2017 for the latter charge, though it was not immediately clear if it resulted in a conviction.

The sheriff’s office added that there was a warrant out for Griffin’s arrest, which was issued in March, stemming from his alleged failure to report for missing drug screens as part of a pre-trial bond supervision.

Since Griffin has not been arrested, it was unclear Saturday if he has legal representation.

ABC News’ Mark Osborne contributed to this report.

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